Dewonkify – Overseas Contingency Operations

Term: Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO)

Definition: OCO funding is money set aside in the federal budget for expenses connected to overseas operations such as: crisis response, infrastructure and coalition support for operations in Iraq/Afghanistan, humanitarian assistance in the Middle East and North Africa, and embassy security among other needs abroad.

Used in Sentence: “‘I have received some questions about the willingness to do OCO as a pay-for,” Fisher wrote. “Chairman Wyden is VERY OPEN to considering OCO as a pay-for. If that is the position of your organization, please include that in your support letters … [and] convey this sentiment in your meetings with senators.’ The email sheds light on the status of negotiations over a permanent “doc fix.” Lawmakers are closer than ever to repealing the SGR, but deciding how to offset the reform is proving a major challenge.

Wyden, the Finance Committee’s newly installed chief, is hardly the first lawmaker to suggest war spending as a way to fund an SGR fix. The idea has been proposed by House Democrats and has support from major players in the medical community.             -The Hill

History: Following the terror attacks of 2011, President George W. Bush’s administration requested Congress provide specific funds to pursue the “Global War on Terror.” Beginning in 2009 the administration of President Barack Obama changed from using the “Global War on Terror” terminology to instead employing the nomenclature of “Overseas Contingency Operations” and the funds to support the effort became known as OCO.  Due to the reduced U.S. military presence in Iraq and Afghanistan, the need for OCO funding is declining.  In Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 OCO outlays/expenditures were $93 billion and the President’s request for OCO in FY 2015 has decreased to $85 billion.  Currently, there is a debate in Congress about the possibility of using the OCO funds as “savings” to pay-for other expenses (i.e. SGR)—Democrats contend that reallocating OCO funds would account for actual savings, while Republicans claim that since the monies have not actually been spent it is not real savings, just money the nation no longer needs to spend.

This entry was posted in 113th Congress, Budget, Dewonkify, House, Senate and tagged , , , , by Jose Woss. Bookmark the permalink.
Jose Woss

About Jose Woss

José Woss is passionate about policy issues and the legislative process. José works closely with the team to research policy and legislative matters to find creative approaches to client needs. He focuses his work primarily on health care issues, global health policy, and foreign relations. He assists clients with scheduling and coordination of Hill days and meetings with Congressional staff. José enjoys monitoring important Congressional and regulatory matters. Additionally, drawing from his personal appreciation for technology and social media, he works to promote the success of both the team and the team’s clients through Twitter. Before joining the District Policy Group, José worked for U.S. Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ). As a staff assistant and interim deputy press secretary, he honed his passion for policy and advocacy. José currently lives in Washington, D.C. Previously, José was an advocate in the New York/New Jersey region. He worked directly with underrepresented communities as a social worker in Housing Works’ Brooklyn, NY office and as a case aid/interpreter for West African refugees with the International Institute of New Jersey in Jersey City, NJ. José graduated from Montclair State University with a bachelor’s degree in french translation and international studies. He is currently pursuing a Master of Public Administration at American University. He loves to bike long-distance, and listen to podcasts, including the BBC World Service, political satire and commentary, and NPR.

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